Mar 25, 2020 6:03 PM

Local, area businesses among HIRE loan recipients

Posted Mar 25, 2020 6:03 PM
<b>Bogey's is one of the local businesses that will receive a HIRE Fund loan. </b>Photo courtesy the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/Bogeys-250383960006/">Bogey's</a> Facebook page.
Bogey's is one of the local businesses that will receive a HIRE Fund loan. Photo courtesy the Bogey's Facebook page.

TOPEKA – Within 48 hours of Governor Laura Kelly announcing the establishment of the Hospitality Industry Relief Emergency (HIRE) Fund, all $5 million allocated for the loan program have been awarded.

“The hospitality industry in Kansas was one of the first to be hit financially by the COVID-19 crisis,” Governor Kelly said. “Department of Commerce Secretary David Toland and the teams at Commerce and NetWork Kansas moved swiftly to stand up the HIRE Fund program and process applications in a short period to help us quickly get these critical dollars into the hands of hospitality businesses across the state.”

The initial response to the HIRE Fund program was overwhelming. More than 1,400 applications for funding were received, with more than 800 submitted within 24 hours of the program being announced.

In total, 344 Kansas hospitality businesses will receive HIRE Fund loans. In the Kansas City metro area, $2 million will be distributed amongst 136 businesses; in Sedgwick County, $1 million will be distributed to 68 companies; and across the rest of the state, $2 million will be distributed to 140 businesses.

“We know that many Kansas businesses are struggling right now, and we know that $5 million doesn’t come close to making up the losses that the hospitality industry and others have and will continue to incur,” Secretary Toland said. “But anything we can do – no matter how big or how small – to infuse dollars into Kansas businesses to help them make payroll, pay their electric bills or meet their mortgage obligations, we’re going to do it.”

The HIRE Fund, which was announced Friday, offers Kansas hospitality businesses including event and convention centers, restaurants, bars and lodging facilities one-time, zero-interest loans up to $20,000. The program is administered by NetWork Kansas, a non-profit with a system of small business loan underwriters across 64 Kansas counties.

“Standing up a new loan fund within a matter of days wouldn’t have been possible without our partners at NetWork Kansas,” Secretary Toland said. “Their team spent hours over the weekend processing and responding to the hundreds of applications received, and we couldn’t be more grateful for their support to get these dollars quickly into the hands of those who need it most right now.”

Local and area businesses that are recipients of the HIRE Fund loans include the following.

DICKINSON COUNTY

Abilene's Victorian, LLC, Abilene

Ortus Cafe, Inc. Abilene,

ELLSWORTH COUNTY

Mugs’s Downtown Bohemian Bakery, Ellsworth

MARION COUNTY

Historic Elgin Hotel, Marion

Wagon Wheel Express, Marion

MCPHERSON COUNTY

Five Loaves LLC, McPherson

REPUBLIC COUNTY

Wood Shop Pizza and Coffee, Belleville

SALINE COUNTY

Blue Skye Brewery and Eats, Salina

Bogey's Inc., Salina

DDR Concepts LLC dba Martinelli's Little Italy, Salina

Tapi Ratan Hospitality LLC, Salina

While there are no funds currently available, applications are still be accepted should future dollars for the HIRE Fund be made available. Hospitality businesses should visit https://kansascommerce.gov/hirefund to complete their application. 

Businesses also can apply for federal disaster loan assistance up to $2 million through the U.S. Small Business Administration at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

Continue Reading Salina Post
Mar 25, 2020 6:03 PM
Look for ways to help children cope during crisis, experts say

MANHATTAN – Children and adults experience and react differently in times of crisis.

“We sometimes only think of disasters as weather-related events, but we know that anything that disrupts daily life and community well-being on a large scale is a disaster,” said Bradford Wiles, associate professor and extension specialist with Kansas State University’s College of Health and Human Services. “Thinking about and being compassionate in how we all feel and process our emotions is crucial to our own, our families’, and our communities’ resilience in the face of the current pandemic.” 

A K-State publication, written by Wiles and associate professor and extension specialist Elizabeth Kiss, includes information that can help communities recognize the negative effects that tough times have on the mental well-being of children.

The publication, titled Disasters: Children’s Responses and Helping Them Recover, is available online from the K-State Research and Extension bookstore.

Wiles and Kiss outline suggested ways parents can help children cope during hard times:

  1. Reassure the child that you are still together and that you will be there to help as long as you can.
  2. Return to pre-disaster routines to the extent possible, including bedtime, bath time, meal time and waking up times.
  3. Make sure you are taking care of yourself. It can be difficult to take care of a child if you are not feeling well.
  4. Talk with your child about your feelings.
  5. Encourage children to draw, write or tell stories about their experiences. Talking about how the disaster or tough time has changed them can be beneficial.

The publication also includes signs to look for in children and how to emerge in a positive direction from times of crisis.

K-State Research and Extension has compiled numerous publications and other information to help people take care of themselves and others during times of crisis. See the complete list of resources online.

Local K-State Research and Extension agents are still on the job during this time of closures and confinement. They, too, are practicing social distancing. Email is the best way to reach them, but call forwarding and voicemail allow for closed local offices to be reached by phone as well (some responses could be delayed). To find out how to reach your local agents, visit the K-State Research and Extension county and district directory.

Signs of depression

Signs of depression in early childhood: tantrums, physical complaints, brief periods of sadness, listlessness or hyperactivity, lack of interest in activities, withdrawal.

Signs of depression in middle childhood: new phobias, hyperactivity, conduct disorders (lying or stealing), refusal to leave parents, periods of sadness, vague anxiety or agitation, suicidal thoughts.

Signs of depression in adolescents: changes in appearance, withdrawal, fatigue, eating problems, substance abuse, risk-taking, sudden change in peer group, loss of interest, sleep problems, hostility, suicidal thoughts.

-- Source: Disasters: Children’s Responses and Helping Them Recover